Friday, January 23, 2009



By: A. Kwesi Kassah,

Even though I do not belong to any political party, I have been following with great interest the political battle in my motherland, especially the race between the numerous candidates working hard to become the next presidential candidate of the NPP. It is also interesting to read about the kind of political tactics and economic resources that are being deployed in this political game.

While some of the candidates are claiming seniority and therefore the right to inherit the NPP throne, others feel that there is the need for the youth to take over the affairs of Ghana after 50 years’ search for prosperity. The idea of having young and dynamic Ghanaians to steer the affairs of Ghana sounds good, but will the youth be given the chance?

While some presidential aspirants refer to their academic laurels and competence in running state ministries and hospitals, others boast of youthful exuberance. One aspirant even went to the extent of requesting Ghanaians to measure his ability to move the country forward in terms of his sexual agility. While another aspirant is being politically discredited for being the current president’s brother, another is under attack for being the President’s “choice”. There are also accusations and counter accusations that some aspirants are playing the ethnic card.

Many see Alan K, for instance, as one who is destroying the game for them and launching attacks on him for “redistributing” his politically acquired wealth. It is not difficult to understand why NPP sympathisers desert an aspirant’s campaign meeting when Alan lands in town. Simply, the guy seems to have a dynamic campaign style and does not want to leave anything to chances.

It looks as if this gentleman has a tactical foresight that his competitors lack. He seems to know what needs to be done to win the hearts of Ghanaians, most of who are being hit hard by the drastic capitalist economic policies that are being experimented in Ghana today. Here is a man who knows what time means in a serious political race for a new presidential candidate for the ruling party. While he deemed it important to travel by plane to reach his followers, others were not even “aware” that this opportunity exists (existed?), let alone exploit it.

In a country where we know that poverty is a killer disease, we cannot wait any longer, but elect a leader who can create jobs, make money and share it with others. Even though Alan’s attempts are viewed by many as madness, ordinary Ghanaians also know that the only time they can gain from politics is when their support is being sought. The ordinary Ghanaian knows very well that as soon as the elections are over, s/he will not receive one new cedi from any politician.

The Ghanaian electorate knows very well that those elected into office often lack the necessary political will and drive to develop and implement appropriate policies that will alleviate their poverty. They know so well that after giving them their nod, these elected officials will only be interested in amassing ill-gotten wealth and de-prioritising the well-being of the ordinary Ghanaian. They are also fully aware that the chosen will only be hurling insults at them in parliament and other political arena for daring to approach them for support.

The ordinary Ghanaian should no longer rely on the empty words of power hungry and self-serving politicians, but elect a leader who can develop and implement policies that will create wealth and economic growth, and ensure equitable distribution of the country’s resources. Judging from his campaign Alan K might be such a leader. God Bless Ghana!